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Profile Statements/images

Kia ora 

Please find below a number of profile statements about me that can be used to help publicise and promote your event. The images can also be copied from here. Information is located below each image.

14 words

Te Ahukaramū Charles Royal is an independent researcher and consultant, and a freelance composer.

43 words

Te Ahukaramū Charles Royal is an independent researcher and consultant on indigenous knowledge, and a freelance composer, musician and storyteller. He is a passionate advocate for ‘indigenous creativity’, which he pursues through research and consultancy services as well as through music and storytelling.

Image by Sara Hindle. JPEG, 65KB, 652x652 (Please ensure credit appears.)

Image by Sara Hindle. JPEG, 65KB, 652x652 (Please ensure credit appears.)

67 words

Te Ahukaramū Charles Royal is an independent researcher and consultant on indigenous knowledge (mātauranga Māori). He is also a freelance composer, musician and storyteller and is a passionate advocate for ‘indigenous creativity’. He provides research and consultancy services to the public sector and to iwi organisations. He composes music and story for small and large groups and his iwi affiliations are Marutūahu, Ngāti Raukawa and Ngā Puhi.

168 words

Te Ahukaramū Charles Royal is an independent researcher and consultant, and a freelance composer, musician and storyteller. He is passionate about the ‘creative potential’ of indigenous knowledge and communities which explores through research, teaching and advising, and through music and story. Charles has written/edited six books and ten reports all on aspects of mātauranga Māori and iwi histories and traditions. He is also the founder and leader of whare tapere – iwi based ‘houses’ of storytelling, dance, games, music and other entertainments – which takes place in Hauraki. Previously he was a Director at Te Papa Tongarewa Museum of New Zealand, Director of Graduate Studies and Research at Te Wānanga-o-Raukawa, Ōtaki, and Professor of Indigenous Development and Director, Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga, University of Auckland. Charles belongs to Marutūahu, Ngāti Raukawa and Ngā Puhi.

264 words

Dr Charles Royal (Te Ahukaramū) is an independent composer, teacher, researcher and cultural leader. He is deeply interested in the development of a new tangata whenuatanga (indigenous communities and life ways) particularly as this may be achieved through music, performing arts, education and research. Charles is the leader of the modern whare tapere - community based 'houses' of storytelling, dance, games, music and other entertainments – and he is the Artistic Director of Ōrotokare: Art, Story, Motion Trust which convenes an annual whare tapere upon Charles’s papakāinga in Hauraki.

Previously, Charles was a Director at Te Papa Tongarewa Museum of New Zealand (2016-19), Professor of Indigenous Development, and Director of Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga, at the University of Auckland (2009-2014) and Director of Graduate Studies and Research at Te Wānanga-o-Raukawa, Ōtaki (1994-2002).

Charles has received numerous awards for his ground-breaking work in mātauranga Māori and indigenous knowledge. He has been a Fulbright Scholar (2001), a Winston Churchill Fellow (2001) and a Resident at the Rockefeller Study and Conference Centre, Bellagio, Italy (2004). From 2011 to 2014, Charles was a Visiting Fellow at the University of London (programme entitled ‘Indigeneity in the Contemporary World: Performance, Politics, Belonging’ lead by Prof Helen Gilbert).

Charles has published six books and ten monographs - all on aspects of mātauranga Māori and iwi histories and traditions – the most recent being Te Ngākau(2009), a text in Māori on the nature of knowledge and knowing. Charles is a graduate of the Victoria University of Wellington School of Music and he also completed a doctorate in theatre and film studies from Victoria University in 1998.

Image by Maarten Holt, Fairfax Media. JPEG, 1.5mb (Pease ensure credit appears)

Image by Maarten Holt, Fairfax Media. JPEG, 1.5mb (Pease ensure credit appears)